Botswana Bound

In 24 hours we will be on our way to Botswana. This will be my second visit to Botswana  but for Rob it will be his third trip. Our primary reason for heading off to Africa is to volunteer as veterinarians with two amazing organizations. Well, honestly the reality is that we LOVE Africa and being able to offer our skills to these two great organizations is a bonus! Being animal nerds we both grew up watching Wild Kingdom and dreaming of someday visiting Africa. For us, it is magical to see, smell and hear the wildlife on this continent and putting in long days as volunteer vets is well worth the pay off of time in this amazing country.

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During our time in Africa we will be representing the Canadian Animal Assistance Team  or CAAT which is partnering with a local organization, the Maun Animal Welfare Society or MAWS. CAAT was founded in 2005, in response to the overwhelming need for veterinary care in the wake of Hurricane Katrina.  Since this time, CAAT has expanded an its primary focus is on running animal health care projects in low-income communities with limited or no access to veterinary services for their animal both in Canada and abroad.  This organization is completely volunteer driven and does amazing work.  If you are interested in learning more about CAAT or donating, check out their website and know your donation dollars are being put to great use www.caat-canada.org 

Located in Maun Botswana, MAWS provides free veterinary services to low income villagers across Botswana.  The primary focus of our time in Maun will be providing spay, neuter and vaccination clinics to reduce pet overpopulation in the area as well as emergency veterinary services and treatments. We will also visit rural areas and set up mobile outreach clinics on an as needed basis.  In Botswana, villagers live side-by-side with Botswana’s rich and varied wildlife. MAWS work helps to prevent the transmission of rabies and canine distemper: diseases which can decimate wildlife including the African Wild Dog, lions, leopards and cheetahs. In addition to veterinary care, MAWS works to reunite, rehome, and rehabilitate lost, found, and stray animals. Check out their website at www.maunanimalwelfare.com

So how do you pack for 7 weeks in Botswana?  We find travelling with just a carry on is the best option. No worries about lost luggage and easy to make your connection gates when you  like to travel cheap and have multiple connections enroute to the final destination.  We will fly from Spokane WA to Seattle WA, Washington DC to Addis Ababa Ethiopia, then on to Livingstone, Zambia and finally to Gabarone Botswana. After an overnight in Gabarone in order to get our veterinary licences in order with the Botswana authorities we will fly to Maun.  Hey, the price was right and as Rob says if you aren’t having fun, then you better have a good story! After a short overnight rest we will start work the following day.

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Nigel helping us pack

After traveling with different types of luggage from traditional suitcases, duffel bags to backpacks we are firmly in the backpack camp of travellers.  As our age increases our pack size and weight decreases. This is lucky as our flight from Washington DC to Addis Ababa Ethiopia allows only one 7 kg carry on and one 5 kg personal item. In addition to the clothes I will wear, here is my packing list: 3 short sleeve t-shirts, 1 long sleeve sun shirt , 2 pairs of shorts, bathing suit, socks, undies, pair of sandals, sun hat, rain coat, first aid kit, toiletry kit, spare reading glasses, sunglasses, eReader, various charging cables, water bottle stuffed with Kind bars, a headlamp with spare batteries and a small bluetooth speaker to rock out during surgeries! Rob’s pack is pretty similar but includes a couple big bags of monocryl suture, bug spray, sunscreen and our laptop.

Initially we had planned to spend Christmas in Africa with our cool and amazing kids, then continue traveling after the holidays and see more of Africa. However plans have changed, as it was not possible to get the entire family to Botswana so we have booked our return flights to Canada in order to spend Christmas together. We do have some fun things planned for 2018 but will keep them secret for now (don’t want to jinx it)!

More to follow in the weeks to come. Next post will be from abroad!

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The Story of Frank and Zelda

The early years of running our own veterinary hospital were hard. We were open 6 days a week, on call 7 days a week and raising two young children with no family close by for support. I know this sounds like one of those stories you tell your kids… “you think you have it tough, well let me tell you about tough! Ever try to repair a smashed pelvis and fractured femur with a drooling baby on your back and another one screaming in a playpen next door?” I’m not complaining, it’s just the facts of what our early years as practice owners were like. It was the life we chose and after every exhausting day we looked at each other and agreed it sure beat being back in the dysfunctional partnership we had escaped. In those early years of raising a practice and raising a family, one of the highlights of every night was bedtime. I know, all you parents out there can relate…please, please just go to sleep, we need some adult time. No, the highlight wasn’t getting the kids to sleep, (although this was sweet too), the highlight of our day was story time.  Clean and warm from their bath and cuddled in their jammies we would take turns laying down on their little beds and reading stories. Often, for two exhausted vets, this turned into the kids poking us and saying mommy/daddy finish the story, as we found we were reading ourselves into slumber. I recall Dr. Suess books being especially effective at putting us soundly to sleep.

A little book called “Pizza for Breakfast”, was one of our favorite stories from this period. I do not recall how it ended up in our home, but it was a lovely little fable about Frank and Zelda, two portly restauranteurs who ran a small mom and pop pizza shop. They worked hard making their delicious pizza but were always wishing for more…more customers, a bigger restaurant, etc. After each wish, a “little man” would show up at the restaurant and their wish would be granted. Unfortunately, as each of their desires came true, a set of new problems appeared and they would end up lamenting to each other…”Frank/Zelda we need a plan”.

Our journey as veterinarians was not unlike Frank and Zelda’s (minus the magic little man to grant us our wishes, we just had hard work and staying power on our side) and over the years on those particularly difficult, stressful or truly draining days one of us would catch the other’s eye and say “Frank/Zelda we need a plan”.

How do you sell a veterinary practice? Well, obviously you need a plan and be prepared that plan is going to take some time to execute. Our goal was to get out before we were a couple of washed up, cranky shells of our former selves but still had enough energy to start a new chapter. So how do you sell a multi doctor veterinary practice without going corporate? These days it ain’t easy but we have a few tips for those of you in the same situation.

  1. Stop being a dick and start mentoring your young associates. I am not kidding about this, treat your entire team the way you would want to be treated if you were in their position. Respect, responsibility and appreciation for what they do for you goes along way with all your employees. Model the leadership you want to instil in the new owner and be patient. If you deal with your employees with honesty, transparency and respect you are setting the foundation for a respectful ownership transition.
  2. Evaluate your motives for selling and make sure your are truly ready to let go of the reins and give up control. This was a big one for me. Are you mentally ready to move on and let someone else take control of your practice? Only you can answer this question but you better spend some time reflecting on it and make sure you will be able to step aside when the time comes.
  3.  Have a professional evaluation long before you decide to sell. Address any management problems and get the place in tip top shape prior to looking getting serious about a sale.
  4. Recognize it is going to get stressful and set up expectations at the beginning of your negotiations. We have a great relationship with the associate who purchased our practice but even so, we all agreed that what was most important, to the three of us, was to remain friends. Then, when things get tense, and they will, be ready to step back, put yourself in the buyer’s shoes and be reasonable. Do you really want to sell? You better be willing to give a little and not always get your way.
  5. Let go of your ego, the stories of how much you sacrificed to build your practice and say goodbye to your ridiculous expectations of what your practice is worth. At the end of the day, it is worth what someone will pay for it. Get an evaluation, negotiate for a fair price but again, don’t be a dick. That will just lose you a sale and potentially a valued friendship.
  6. Don’t look back. When the documents are signed and you hand over the keys to the kingdom just pat yourself on the back and be happy. When the dust settles, you will realize you’ve given yourself a gift, the freedom to begin a new chapter and the chance to turn to each other and say “Frank/Zelda we need a plan”.