Viva Mexico, Viva Mazunte Project!

The world is full of people who want to make a difference. People who are idealistic, people with drive and focus, people with a specific skill set, people with a mission, people with positive energy.  The problem is getting all of these people working as a team where they are willing to set their own ego aside, in order to collaborate and work together, towards a common goal. Those of you working in the veterinary industry can probably relate to how difficult this is in “our world”. Dysfunctional teams seem to be the norm rather than the exception and when you find a team that truly embraces and lives the meaning of the word team, (ie. they’ve got each other’s backs and build each other up daily) hang on for dear life and count your blessings that you found your tribe. 

It may behoove the veterinary profession to take a look at the work of companies like Google. Much of the work carried out at Google is done by teams (sound familiar) and researchers at google have taken the time to look at the secret of effective teams. Project Aristotle, a code name based on Aristotle’s quote “the whole is greater than the sum of its parts” was Googles attempt to answer the question “What makes an effective team?”  The results shouldn’t surprise us and yet I see our profession still struggling to get this right. Without getting into a long winded discussion about what constitutes a team, (an interdependent work group that plans, solves problems and needs each other to get shit done) and what constitutes effective (depends on the situation but lets just say its getting the shit done that your team leader wants you to get done in an efficient, cost effective and timely fashion) what did Google’s Project Aristotle learn?  After accounting for bias and other variables as well as conducting hundreds of double blind interviews, what came through loud and clear was this. What made a difference to team effectiveness was less about who was on the team and more about how the team worked together. Sorry all you smarty pants but just because your team is full of people with a high IQ, it does not necessarily have a positive correlation with positive outcomes and an effective team. In order of importance, here are the things that had the biggest positive impact on team performance:

1. Psycological safety: This refers to the individuals perception of the consequences of taking and interpersonal risk. In lay terms it is feeling safe to speak up without fear of consequences. Do your team mates have your back and create a safe space for dissenting opinions without fear of belittling, punishment or embarrassment.

2.  Dependability: Members reliably complete work on time with no shirking of responsibility.

3.  Structure and Clarity:  Individuals understand their role on the team and have a           clear understanding of expectations and consequences.

4.  Meaning:  Finding a sense of purpose in either the work itself or the outcome.

5.  Impact: The subjective judgement that your work is making a difference.

Finally I would like to add my own 2 cents, for what it is worth:

6.  Appreciation: Team members need to feel their work is not only meaningful and impactful but also appreciated. A heartfelt thank you goes a long way, whether from the team leader, team mates or the public you serve.

A veterinary volunteer projects is a special type of team. In order to meet its goals, it has to find a way satisfy all these positive predictive factors in a very short period of time. Add to this the fact that volunteers come from a widely diverse set of experiences, backgrounds and represent a wide range of personality types. Finally consider that many volunteers are experiencing various levels of culture shock and personal discomfort as they are visiting a new country where weather, food and cultural conditions may be vastly different from “home”. Considering all of this, it amazes me that any veterinary project can strive to meet the criteria of effective teams as laid out by Google’s Project Aristotle, and yet the Mazunte Project succeeds in doing just that.  (See “Adventure Awaits: Reflections on Hobbits, Home and Veterinary Volunteerism” for more tips on what to look for in a volunteer project abroad.) 

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Dr. Pierre DePorre, Dr. Emery Engers and 4th year students from MSU: Melissa, Pedro, Jamie and Jill

The maze of international animal welfare or veterinary spay and neuter projects is a bit of a rabbit hole. Once you enter the warren, it can take you to places and experiences you never imagined. Rob and I first heard out about the Mazunte Project over a year ago, and started firing off emails in an attempt to learn more about this cool project and see if we could “charm” our way onto it! Our efforts put us in touch with an amazing human being, Rich Rodger, someone I am now proud to call a friend and who I aspire to emulate in the years remaining to me. In a roundabout way, Rich along with a small group of passionate people including Hugh Davis and Nancy Fantom (my team leaders in 2019) organized the first sterilization project back in  2000. Over the past 19 years, the Mazunte Project has grown from that small team of 9 people to approximately 50 volunteers in 2019. What started as a small grass roots organization has grown to include not only a team of dedicated volunteers (mostly from Massachusetts, New Hampshire and Michigan) but also a team of students and mentors from Michigan State University, and most recently a collaboration with La Universidad Autonoma Benito Juarez de Oaxaca (UABJO), the veterinary school in Oaxaca. Add a couple of Canadians and you have a true cross border collaboration. Pretty cool indeed!  Note: plans are underway to interview Rich and write a blog on the history and his experiences over 19 years of organizing the Mazunte Project.

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Rob preforming surgery in a small village as the sun sets

Over the past 19 years, visiting small villages up and down the Pacific Coast of Oaxaca, this group has made not only a positive impact on the health of local dogs but by reducing dog overpopulation in the region, it has also reduced dog predation of sea turtle eggs and hatchlings and is slowly changing attitudes towards animal welfare and conservation in the region. Rich and other volunteers described to me the packs of dogs that used to be found on the beaches and nesting grounds of Golfino (Olive Ridley), Black (Green), Hawksbill and Leatherback sea turtles in the early years of the project.  Unsterilized dogs, reproduce quickly and too many dogs leads to hungry animals competing for food.  Beaches full of turtle eggs turn into a food source for the local dogs. In addition, for many years the local people of the Oaxaca region harvested turtles and eggs for food and export.  In 1991, the Mexican Government banned the harvesting of turtles and eggs and in 1994 the Turtle Center was established with the goal to provide education, protection and research for the local sea turtle population. One of the key players at Palmarito Turtle Conservation is Dr. Marcelino Lopes-Reyes.  A veterinarian of boundless energy and passion for animals. He has been a driving force behind turtle conservation in the area, patrolling beaches, relocating nests, finding villages for our teams to visit and encouraging local people to sterilize their dogs. In 2019 the Mazunte Project visited 30 villages and the final count of dogs (and cats) sterilized up and down the Oaxaca coast came in at 744. Considering the conditions we are working in and the fact that teams had 5 days to come together and form a successful MASH unit, it is beyond impressive. Even more impressive to me, was the comaraderie and positive energy of this group. Bitching, complaining and big egos have no place on effective teams. There seemed to be an underlying understanding that we were here to get a job done and have fun doing it!

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Dr. Hugh Davis preforming a cat neuter with Dr. Marcelino Lopes-Reyes observing

After spending two weeks working with the Mazunte Project, it is obvious their work is having an impact. On arrival I was impressed with the healthy (even fat in some cases) appearance of the local dog population, not only in the tourist areas of Mazunte, San Augustinillo and Zipolite but also in most of the small rural villages we visited. With time and education, attitudes towards animal welfare are changing. I was very fortunate to visit several of the more remote beaches and see turtle nesting grounds as well as witness a mass hatching of Olive Ridley turtles following a recent Arribada. A small group of volunteers were up early and headed off to see if we could help a few more hatchings make it to the ocean. During the 3.5 hours we were on the beach I saw one pack, of 5 dogs, roving the beach and digging up turtle eggs.  Given the number of dogs on this beach 20 years ago, this is a huge reduction. 

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Collecting hatchlings in my hat to protect them from birds that storm the beach as the sun rises

 

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As a species, humans have been too successful. Our growth and our greed are destroying the planet. It is what successful organisms do but it is at the expense of so many other species. On my more pessimistic days I feel overwhelmed and wonder how “Mother Nature” has any hope against us? But then, I wake up, look around and see how much beauty we still have left and know we cannot let it go without a fight. It is awe inspiring to see these cute little guys, emerge from the sand and struggle against all odds to complete an ancient journey. A journey deeply embedded in their genetic code which we as humans struggle to understand. I was told for every 100 turtle hatchlings, only 2 make it back to nest again on the same beach. The odds are stacked against them and still they don’t give up. We need to follow their example. Go outside, look around and find what inspires you, what leaves you awestruck and fight for it in some small way. After seeing what a small group of passionate people have created and the impact it has had I am inspired that we can still make a difference. Thank you Mazunte Project, don’t give up.

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If you want to help the turtles of the Oaxaca Coast visit www.palmaritoseaturtlerescue.org

Every dollar you give goes directly to turtle conservation, not administration costs. Dr. Marcelino needs a new ATVs to patrol the beaches at night and protect nests as the old one they are using is finally beyond repair. Every dollar you give, will be put to good use. You don’t have to be a veterinarian or veterinary technician to help. Every dollar you give helps as much, or more than the time we have given to this project. Every dollar is appreciated.

3 thoughts on “Viva Mexico, Viva Mazunte Project!”

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