Puppies, Parasites and Penises

I can feel the sweat running down my back as I keep pace with the Black Keys pounding out of our little speaker and close the last spay of the day. I am hot, sweaty, most likely covered in ticks and bone tired but still… this is fun!

We left behind a foot of snow, one week ago to arrive in Botswana during the hottest season of the year. Just before we arrived daily temperatures were above 40 degrees and the landscape is dry and brown. Thankfully we have brought the rains with us and in the last week, evening showers that have magically turned the brown bushes green and brought some blessed relief from the heat. As I sit on our deck and listen the to the call of the hornbills and the cicadas chirping, it feels like we have been here far longer than a week.  We arrived in the capital of Botswana and our first order of business was to visit the Botswana Council of Veterinary Surgeons in order to swear our professional oath and become licensed to practice veterinary medicine in Botswana. A lovely couple Brian and Marilyn Garcin put us up for the night and we were well entertained with a private showing of Brian’s amazing art.  http://www.southafricanartists.com/artists/brian-garcin-6049

Wild dogs by Brian Garcin

From Gabarone, we flew on to Maun, a town of approximately 60,000. Maun is a busy hub for the numerous safari companies in Botswana, given is proximity to the Okavango Delta, and our home base for the next 7 weeks. We were met at the airport by one of the Maun Animal Welfare Society’s (MAWS) volunteers and transported through town and down a sandy track to a small cottage where we will live during our time here.  After dropping our packs, we headed off to check out the veterinary clinic where we were greeted by Gladys, a veterinary nurse from Austrailia who is also vounteering with MAWS. Friendly, confident and practical, we could quickly see it would be a great team.  We were disappointed to learn that she arrived 2 weeks before us and had been managing multiple challenging cases, on her own and was leaving in just another week! Poor timing for all of us, as a trained veterinary nurse or techinican makes surgery days flow more smoothly and we quickly learned that Gladys is a rockstar!

IMG_2522Our home away from home

We started work the next day, Saturday November 11, with a morning of sterilizations, hospitalized patients to check and learning the ropes.  In the afternoon Rob and I were called out to a property to check a group of sick dogs for a local family and experienced how many people in Botswana live.  To give you some idea, just know the cabin above is truly a palace by local standards.  Picture a sandy yard, about the size of an average Canadian yard, with one or two small buildings the size of a large garden shed made out of cinder blocks or bricks and mud, with an open air doorway and tin roof. Then add to that picture, a few straggly, brown trees 4 to 6 barefoot kids, plastic bottles and garbage laying about, 6 to 8 skinny dogs and several adults of different generations sitting in the shade or laying under trees on old mattresses. Rob and I did our best to examine the sick dogs, but we were up against some challenges. All of the dogs were very thin and not eating, but one of the dogs, the owners favorite, has been coughing. The owner tells us that last year he had a dog with similar signs and he died.  We have a stethoscope and thermometer, that’s it…. so what’s your diagnosis?  What is your treatment?  Distemper is common in dogs here and thankfully it did not look like distemper, but the list of possible diseases is long including everything from parasites, like lungworm or heartworm, to infectious diseases and even cancer.  We have no laboratory facilities, not even a microscope and any diagnostic work we can do is extremely limitied. We do what we can, which is basically vaccinate, deworm and prescribe doxycycline (the dogs are covered in ticks, anemic and most have chronic erhlicia infections). We cross our fingers and hope it helps. Sterilization, deworming and vaccinations are the most important contributions we can make. Reducing the pet population, reducing the parasite load, and controlling preventable diseases is vitally important here and helps keep the human community healthier and safer (roaming dog packs can attack livestock and people) as well as reducing the risk of rabies and distemper in susceptible wildlife populations.

IMG_2536Property where we did a house call

As I finish writing this post, it is now Wednesday evening, November 15 and we have completed our first four days with MAWS.  The number of animals sterilized is as follows: Saturday 12, Monday 22, Tuesday 21 and Wednesday 21 for a grand total of 76 in 4 days.  We will be working in the Maun clinic for two more days, then on Saturday and Sunday we will head off into the bush to do a mobile spay and neuter clinic in a more remote rural area without access to veterinary care. In addition to sterilizations we have also examined and treated animals brought in for various reasons. Injuries from being hit by vehicles are common, as are thin, anorexic and vaguely ill animals. The most interesting cases include a puppy who was bitten by a scorpion (so far recovering well) and another pup who had suffered an injury to his prepuce (sheath) which allowed his penis to prolapse out to the side. The wound was quite old and scarred down but we were able to close things up nicely. Rob says if anyone needs some cosmetic surgery on your we we, he can hook you up with a cracker jack surgeon!

Recovery room, getting ready for surgery and Puppy kisses

To finish off this post, I am going to leave you with some insider information on Botswana. Questions your dying to ask but were afraid of the answer:

  1.  Enjoy your one ply toilet paper, even two ply is just a distant dream you spoiled princess.
  2. If you are a vegetarian, be prepared to eat chicken because apparently it is not really meat.
  3. Your bathing suit is actually a “costume” – to all those Rosslanders who love a good costume theme party, just head to the local pool and your good to go.
  4. Don’t drive at night, the donkeys are out and seem to prefer the middle of the road.
  5. Stay left, look right, in Botswana you drive on the left side of the road.  Rob, our fearless driver of “Trevor” (the old truck available for our use), has almost got it down. Thankfully the roads are not to busy! My high pitched yelps help to alert him when he reverts to his Canadian right side of the road driving habit.
  6. Beware the miniture ants, they can consume one hundred times their body weight overnight. Christmas bugs are everywhere. Their main goal seems to be to buzz into me, fall onto the floor and die. Because we are lazy slobs, we let them lay about and by evening a swarm of teeny, tiny ants has gathered about their bug carcasses as if preforming some strange memorial rites and by morning, bug body and ants have disappeared. We are concerned that before the 7 weeks are up, they will one night run out of bugs and devour us in our sleep.
  7. Acuna matata is really thing – everyone we have so far, has been friendly, helpful interested in us and interesting to us.  What a great start to this adventure. Don’t worry, be happy. Botswana is not Canada, but isn’t that the point?

IMG_2503

2 thoughts on “Puppies, Parasites and Penises”

  1. Awesome! Can’t wait to hear the ne t entry. So happy to see life is everything you thought it would be in Africa and more! Perhaps a roll of Royale or Costco toilet paper will find its way under the tree for you this Yuletide season! Beware the prickly leaves!

    Liked by 1 person

  2. Glad to read this and know all is well, Elaine. Your sense of humor hasn’t been taken by the ants or otherwise. Having to lower your standard of care due to limited facilities and resources must be hard. I admire that you find strength in staying true to the mission of the organization you have allied with, and what can be done. For the rest, I send so much light and love and prayers for your safety, wellness and growth as you do your work. Have fun on this most excellent adventure 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

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